Creo Customer: Demolition for the Safety-Conscious

It’s like a chainsaw. But it’s not a chainsaw. It’s an Allsaw? Chainsaws are notoriously the most dangerous hand tool you can purchase without a license. In the U.S. they cause over 40,000 injuries a year.

But there’s a new saw that should save a few body parts: the Petrol Allsaw, invented by Kevin Inkster of Arbortech.

Kevin initially got the idea for a safer saw after his own near miss with a chainsaw while logging. Additionally, he wanted a saw that didn’t become dirt-clogged when going after the “best bits” of a tree for woodworking – the trunk and roots.

His award-winning Allsaw accomplished both his goals for safety and quality.

The Petrol Allsaw is a chain saw and a disc cutter rolled into one, only safer and more versatile than both. The Allsaw’s patented dual blade orbital cutting action combined with a high velocity hammering action means it can cut easily through bricks, wood (especially underground pieces) or cement, but not so easily through human flesh.

Arbortech designed the blades so that there is no exposed cutting edge on the top of the blade, so there is virtually no risk to the user from “kick back” or accidentally falling on the blade. Another design advantage is that the Allsaw doesn’t rely on the sharpness of the blades (although it can easily be sharpened), but instead relies on the torque of the blades.

The handheld saw is even light enough to use for hours.

On this episode of the Product Design Show, Dave and Allison show us how Arbortech engineers took advantage of the entire Creo suite to design the Petrol Allsaw and make it lightweight, easy-to-use, and still powerful enough to cut down a building.

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One Comment

  1. Posted Jun 7, 2012 at 9:31 pm | Permalink

    These gears are indeed manufactured to put a premium on safety for the handler. The price is fair as their mechanisms are built for heavy duty work as well. It is up to the handler to exercise utmost caution when working with these.

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